Archive for the tag 'Snowshill Manor'

We set off on our journey later than we intended, partly due to the inclement weather. Along the way we spotted an ideal cafe for lunch, but the mornings downpour had turned the parking area into a field of mud! This meant we had to abandon the idea of lunch there, it also involved some [...]

16 Comments CherryPie on May 19th 2016

But pleasures are like poppies spread,
You seize the flower, it’s bloom is shed;
Or, like the snow-fall in the river,
A moment white, then melts forever.
Robert Burns

16 Comments CherryPie on Jan 25th 2015

Work is currently underway to restore the imaginary fishing village of Wolf’s Cove which previously stood around the large pool at Snowshill Manor.
National Trust SW reports in May 2013:

Snowshill has a lost village called Wolf’s Cove which will be excavated this year. It will then be completely reconstructed based on documents and archaeological evidence.
Quirky and [...]

10 Comments CherryPie on Jul 23rd 2014

There is a recurring dragon theme in the gardens at Snowshill Manor.  The photo above is of a statue of St. George and the Dragon. It was commissioned by Charles Wade from a Tyrolean craftsman, A. Dapre. It is a copy in teak of a statue that is housed in the Victoria and Albert Museum. [...]

8 Comments CherryPie on Jul 22nd 2014

The music room contains instruments from the 18th and 19th century, showing some fine examples of English craftsmanship. A Latin inscription above the door translates as ‘Man is carried to heaven on the wings of music’.  Within the room there is an angel with no wings hanging from the ceiling.

The instruments are displayed in groups [...]

14 Comments CherryPie on Jul 21st 2014

Hours fly,
Flowers die,
New days,
New ways,
Pass by.
Love stays.
Henry Van Dyke (from the poem Katrina’s Sun-Dial)

23 Comments CherryPie on Jul 20th 2014

The first hint of Charles Wade is seen even before entering the house: the post-box to the left of the door carries his coat of arms together with his motto NEQUID PEREAT, which means ‘Let nothing perish’. The phrase not only reflects the purpose of the collection but also the way in which Wad went [...]

16 Comments CherryPie on Jul 19th 2014

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