…on Easter Sunday

The Church of St Swithun upon Kingsgate

The Church of St Swithun upon Kingsgate has been a place of worship for more than 750 years. The church, built in the middle ages is located above the medieval Kingsgate, one of the principle entrances to the city. The church is unusual in that it forms part of the city wall.

From Wikipedia:

The first mention of the church is recorded in 1264, when it was apparently burned by the citizens of Winchester during a dispute with the Priory.[2] Most likely the church served as a chapel for lay people who worked for the Abbey.[1] In 1337 some woodwork was done on the church, costing a total of fifteen shillings, and in 1484 the windows underwent repair.[2]

St Swithun was an Anglo Saxon saint, born in Winchester and in 852 becoming the 19th bishop of the city. He died in 862 when King Alfred the Great was still a young man.[2] It is possible that St Swithun was tutor to the young king, and accompanied him on a pilgrimage to Rome.[2]

By the 17th century the church had fallen into disrepair, and had become home to one Robert Allen, the porter of Kings Gate, and his wife, “who did and doth keep swine at ye ende of the Chapell”.[1][2] The situation was improved around 1660 when the church was restored, its bells re-hung in 1677.[1] It has remained a place of worship since that time.[2]

The Church of St Swithun upon Kingsgate

The Church of St Swithun upon Kingsgate

The Easter Garden

The Church of St Swithun upon Kingsgate

The Church of St Swithun upon Kingsgate

The Church of St Swithun upon Kingsgate

12 Comments CherryPie on May 26th 2019

12 Responses to “The Church of St Swithun upon Kingsgate…”

  1. The problems with having a church as part of the city wall that stood over the main street as an entrance to town were: the noise of the horses hooves and the smell of the pig poo. But if as you say the church probably served as a chapel for lay people who worked for the Abbey, perhaps the clerics didn’t mind.

    The space looks well designed, doesn’t it?

  2. What an interesting and beautiful church. I do like all the flowers and the stained glass looks beautiful. I was sorry in an earlier post to read the sad news about your aunt. It is a time when there are an awful lot of things to arrange and just when you need time to yourself to recharge your batteries you just haven’t got the time.

  3. The Yum List says:

    I find stained glass very attractive.

  4. shabana says:

    exquisite images of church Cheri !

    not much big yet really fascinating look and these painted windows are so beautiful !

    • CherryPie says:

      I am captivated by this church. I know you would love it. It still holds regular church services despite it being so close to the Cathedral. I loved seeing the Minister and some of his congregation at the bottom of the stairs after one of the Easter services.

  5. I like walking a lot.
    Completed both Capital Ring (70 miles) + London Loop (150 miles) couple of years ago. :)

    http://tfl.gov.uk/modes/walking/capital-ring
    http://tfl.gov.uk/modes/walking/loop-walk

    Perhaps you have something similar in Shropshire?

    • CherryPie says:

      We have several walks that cross near where I live:

      The Shropshire Way is 200 miles

      https://shropshireway.org.uk/

      But many of the other local walking routes of 50 or 60 miles connect up with other long distance routes. So there are many choices for a long distance walker.

      Did you walk your routes all in one go? Or bit by bit?

      • >Did you walk your routes all in one go? Or bit by bit?

        No, not in one go. Broken down into many routes in random order.
        Longer routes (>10 miles) completed in summer; shorter ones (The Shropshire Way is 200 miles

        Oh I think I would enjoy the North Route a lot.
        Walking along the canal, river or coast line is very rewarding.

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