Archive for the tag 'Catholic'

Dorney Court is a Grade I listed Tudor manor house and is situated in the village of Dorney which lies on a slight rise in the Thames floodplain, Dorney means Island of Bumble Bees and the estate is renowned for its honey which is still produced to this day. The house has changed little since [...]

6 Comments CherryPie on Oct 2nd 2017

Hurley Priory, located on the banks of the River Thames was founded in 1086 by Geoffrey Mandeville I as a cell of Westminster Abbey. After declaring himself head of the English Church, Henry VIII suppressed the priory in 1536 and ownership was transferred to Westminster Abbey. When in 1540 Westminster Abbey was dissolved Hurley Priory [...]

10 Comments CherryPie on Sep 26th 2017

On my recent visit to the Olde Bell in Hurley I noticed some information above a wooden panel next to the fireplace. I was intrigued by it and took a closer look. The photo and words informed that a passage runs from the cellar of the Olde Bell to the Village Priory and the passage [...]

12 Comments CherryPie on Sep 25th 2017

Bear with me…
Content coming soon
Update 18/09/17 – links to currently uploaded posts added below. I have some posts yet to be written. I also need to add an intro to this post

People:
Imprisoned – John Gerard, Catholic Priest, 1597
John Gerard’s story told in the Salt Tower, Tower of London
The Autobiography of a [...]

4 Comments CherryPie on Sep 17th 2017

This chapel was used from about 1590 until the opening of the Georgian Chapel in 1743. It contains three features, from the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries, which illustrate the gradual easing of persecution over the century and a half. At first all ‘Massing Stuff’ had to be concealed when not in use, and so, [...]

10 Comments CherryPie on Sep 14th 2017

Harvington Hall, a medieval and Elizabethan manor house situated on an island surrounded by a moat is in the ownership of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Birmingham.

A house full of secrets, Harvington Hall was built in the 1580s by Humphrey Pakington, who was a recusant Catholic under the Protestant rule of Elizabeth I. The hall [...]

18 Comments CherryPie on Sep 6th 2017

For two days, in September 1651, the destiny of Britain was decided within the walls of Moseley Old Hall.

In January 1649 Charles I had been executed in Whitehall, the monarchy had been abolished and the country declared a Commonwealth. The hopes of the Royalist Cause now rested on the shoulders of his eighteen-year-old son, Charles [...]

14 Comments CherryPie on Aug 12th 2017

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