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There has been a church on this yew fringed patch of ground north of the River Thames since at least the 12th century, meaning that today’s congregation continue a tradition of worship that can be traced back nearly 1000 years.

The current chancel dates from the 12th century church but there is archaeological evidence of a pre-Conquest building. In subsequent times the nave has been rebuilt and the floor level raised. At the west end of the nave is a Norman font with decorative designs carved into the stonework around the basin.

The font occupies a central spot beneath an ancient oak gallery which is home to the church organ and, further back even still, sits the massive Tudor tower, the summit of which is the highest point in Dorney.

The south porch, the day to day entrance to the church, is made of ancient red brick and dates to 1661 when it was built to commemorate the birth of Lady Anne Palmer, the child of Barbara Villiers, Countess of Castlemaine and Roger Palmer, Earl of Castlemaine.

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8 Comments CherryPie on Oct 4th 2017

8 Responses to “St James the Less, Dorney”

  1. The Yum List says:

    The entrance to this place seems very “short” compared to other buildings you’ve featured. I wonder if it’s just the angle or if there is a reason. The building looks very sturdy.

  2. Hels says:

    You are right. Great sculptured images of the family at prayer.

  3. Ginnie says:

    “…since at least the 12th century, meaning that today’s congregation continue a tradition of worship that can be traced back nearly 1000 years.” That’s a history, Cherry!

  4. Sorry for the delay.
    Just got back from Wales.
    Did an epic 60-mile walk there.
    Saw so many beautiful towns in Monmouthshire and Powys.

    Anyway, I’m going back to Malaysia this weekend.
    Yeah, travelling again!
    Will be back next month. :)

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