The Windmill Obelisk

TO COMMEMORATE THAT GREAT AND DECISIVE BATTLE FOUGHT IN THIS FIELD .
ON THE DAY OF XIV DAY OF JUNE MDCXLV,
COMMANDED BY HIS MAJESTY
KING CHARLES THE FIRST,
AND THE PARLIAMENT FORCES
HE ADED BY THE GENERALS’ FAIRFAX AND CROMWELL.
WHICH TERMINATED FATALLY
FOR THE ROYAL CAUSE, LED TO THE THR ONE,
THE ALTAR, AND THE CONSTITUTION,
AND FOR YEARS PLUNGED THIS NATION
INTO THE HORRORS OF ANARCHY
AND CIVIL WAR:
LEAVING A USEFUL LESSON TO BRITISH KINGS:
NEVER TO EXCEED THE BOUNDS
OF THEIR JUST PREROGATIVE,
AND TO BRITISH SUBJECTS.
NEVER TO SWERVE FROM THE ALLEGIENCE
DUE TO THEIR LEGITIMATE MONARCH.
THIS PILLAR WAS ERECTED
BY JOHN AND MARY FRANCES FITZGERALD.
LORD AND LADY OF THE MANOR OF NASEBY
AD MDCCCXXIII

The Windmill Obelisk

The decisive battle of the English Civil War was fought in the fields of Naseby, Sulby, Sibbertoft and Clipstone parishes on Saturday 14 June, 1645. The Parliamentarian New Model Army, under the command of Sir Thomas Fairfax, defeated the Royalist army, commanded by King Charles I and Prince Rupert of the Rhine.

Patrols clashed on the evening of 13 June in Naseby village. Early on Saturday 14 June Fairfax marche the New Model Army north from Guilsborough towards Naseby to meet here, at Naseby windmill. The wheeled transport, the baggage and artillery trains, had to stay on the primitive road to avoid getting stuck in the mud. The foot and horse would have chosen their own routes. The regiments were then organised into ‘battalia’, their fighting formation. No one knew if they were going into battle or if they were to continue their pursuit of the Royalist army through Market Harborough and beyond. Would King Charles stand and fight?

By 8.00am King Charles and Rupert had moved the royal army to a ridge between East Farndon and Little Oxendon. From there this position cannot be seen. Similarly the view north from the windmill is limited by the rising ground, so Fairfax and his commander of horse, Oliver Cromwell, had to ride to the edge of the steep hill overlooking Clipston to look for their enemies. **

Cromwell's Position

Cromwell's Position

Both sides wished to fight and Fairfax ordered his army to a position on the ridge to the south of this place. Rupert saw the movement and brought the Royalist to Dust Hill, across the valley to the north.
This area was mostly open ground, but contained by an ancient boundary hedge around Sulby to the west and a rabbit warren (on today’s Lodge Hill) and boggy ground to the east. Lieutenant General of Horse Oliver Cromwell put dragoons behind Sulby Hedges. Their musket fire caused the royalist cavalry on the western flank to charge, forcing many of parliament’s horses to flee. The Royalist foot attacked and almost broke Fairfax’s line but it stubbornly resisted. Cromwells trouper routed the horse opposing them and fell on the left flank of the royalist foot. Despite Rupert’s Bluecoat Regiment ’standing like a wall of brass’ on the slope just to the west of the road to the north, Fairfax’s counter-attacks succeeded in driving the royalists back. Part of the royalist army went on fighting, all the way they had come that morning, in a battle reaching a climax at Wadborough Hill

Naseby Battlefield

*From a signboard next to the Windmill Obelisk
**From a signboard next to Cromwell’s position on the day of the battle

No Comments CherryPie on Dec 12th 2017

I thought that Friday’s unexpected flurry of snow would have thawed out overnight. Although it didn’t snow during saturday the snow lingered making the roads in places quite treacherous.

In the early hours of sunday morning snow started to fall again and didn’t stop for nearly 24 hours. We haven’t seen this much snow for many a year and even when it has snowed it has thawed by mid morning. Not so on this occasion.

Layers of December Snow

I waited a while to see if the sun would melt the snow from my car. I eventually decided to take action and try to remove the snow. I started off with a soft brush, several of my neighbours had used this technique, but I found it rather laborious and not very effective. I resorted to putting a plastic food bag over my glove and scraping the snow off by hand and when I was able to unearth the boot of my car I opened it to retrieve my ice scraper!

There was six inches of snow on the top of my car and several inches on the bonnet so it took me quite some time to remove it. I couldn’t remove it all, the lower layer was ice and the temperature dropped causing the windows to gain a frosty layer.

I had intended to have a go at Mr C’s car too, but I ran out of light and the temperature dropped causing the cars to freeze over again.

I can’t resist sharing a few more snowy garden photographs with you :-)

December Snow

December Snow

December Snow

December Snow

December Snow

14 Comments CherryPie on Dec 11th 2017

Trust in the Lord with all your heart and lean not on your own understanding; in all your ways submit to him, and he will make your paths straight.

Proverbs 3:5-6 (NIV)

December Snow

4 Comments CherryPie on Dec 10th 2017

The Old Grammar School

The timber portion of this building was erected in 1614 by Robert Smyth. It was set upon posts “to keepe the market people drye in tyme of foule wether”. The brick portion was added in 1868 and the building was restored by public subscription in 1978.*

The Old Grammar School

The Old Grammar School

*from a signboard next to the building

16 Comments CherryPie on Dec 9th 2017

Winter Snow

Winter Snow

Winter Snow

Winter Snow

Untitled

Untitled

Winter Snow

The moon of the first photograph returns much later in the day :-)

My Moon Tonight

6 Comments CherryPie on Dec 8th 2017

Traditional

Market Place

20 Comments CherryPie on Dec 7th 2017

The Legend of St George

The central panel shows the legend of St. George killing a dragon outside the city of Antioch.

Below is his wife Sabra who has just borne three boys, one of whom is being carried off by a lion. This romantic addition to the legend was current in the sixteenth century.

St. George is the patron saint of England and of the Royal Order of the Garter. He was also venerated by warrior kings like Henry VIII.

Above St. George are reclining male nudes: a popular motif of renaissance art. God appears in blessing above them.

At the top and the bottom are the initials of Henry and Anne Boleyn: ‘H’ and ‘A’.

Down either side is a frieze of military trophies, appropriate to the general martial theme.

Several different carvers have worked on the stall. The central round panel and the figure of God above it are much finer than the rest of the work. *

The Legend of St George
*From a signboard next to the artwork

6 Comments CherryPie on Dec 6th 2017

Older Posts »