Kitchen

Haddon Hall has a fine example of a surviving Tudor kitchen:

Built in the 14th century, the Kitchen comprises a purely utilitarian set of rooms which originally stood apart from the other buildings to minimise the risk of fire spreading to the main house. The passageway linking the kitchen to the hall is thus a much later addition. *

Looking towards the Milk Larder

The Milk Larder now houses a fine display of ‘dole’ cupboards:

These were put outside houses such as Haddon for passing traders or Estate workers, and filled with food and leftovers from the kitchen. Made in the Gothic style, this collection is very rare as these wooden cupboards were left outside and exposed to the elements. Some are originally from Haddon and others bought by the 9th Duke. The modern phrase ‘on the dole’ (receiving assistance), stems from the purpose of the ‘dole’ cupboard.*

Dole Chests

The oak block, stands on three short legs and was doubtless used for jointing meat in preparation for salting or for catching drops from hanging meat. *

The Oak Block

Preparation Area

*From the Haddon Hall guidebook

19 Comments CherryPie on Aug 13th 2018

Life’s picture is constantly undergoing change. The spirit beholds a new world every moment.

Rumi

Transient Beauty

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The Manacle…

… for unruly diners in the Banqueting Hall at Haddon Hall.

Manacle

This manacle was used as a punishment for those who did not “drink fayre” – a medieval custom whereby those that did not drink their quota of ale were considered a potential threat – and the ale not consumed was poured down the offender’s sleeve. It was also used for restraining unruly revellers. *

Manacle

*From a sign board next to the manacle

12 Comments CherryPie on Aug 11th 2018

The Banqueting Hall

This would have been the communal living space when it was built in the 14th century. Both family and servants would have eaten and slept here. By the beginning of the 15th century however, the family would have begun to eat in the privacy of the Great Chamber and spend their leisure time in the Parlour which acquired the function of a private sitting room. Consequently the Great Hall became a room in which to entertain and hold social events and its name was changed to the Banqueting Hall.*

The Banqueting Hall

The Banqueting Hall

The Banqueting Hall

The Banqueting Hall

*From the Haddon Hall guide book

10 Comments CherryPie on Aug 10th 2018

Haddon Hall

Haddon Hall

Haddon Hall

Haddon Hall

Haddon Hall

Haddon Hall

Haddon Hall

Haddon Hall

12 Comments CherryPie on Aug 9th 2018

Filed under Out & About

Haddon Hall

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Haddon Hall is an English country house on the River Wye near BakewellDerbyshire, one of the seats of the Duke of Rutland. It is currently occupied by Lord Edward Manners (brother of the current Duke) and his family. In form a medieval manor house, it has been described as “the most complete and most interesting house of [its] period”.[1] The origins of the hall date to the 11th century. The current medieval and Tudor hall includes additions added at various stages between the 13th and the 17th centuries.

The Vernon family acquired the Manor of Haddon by a 12th-century marriage between Sir Richard de Vernon and Alice Avenell, daughter of William Avenell II. Four centuries later, in 1563, Dorothy Vernon, the daughter and heiress of Sir George Vernon, married John Manners, the second son of Thomas Manners, 1st Earl of Rutland. A legend grew up in the 19th century that Dorothy and Manners eloped. The legend has been made into novels, dramatisations and other works of fiction. She nevertheless inherited the Hall, and their grandson, also John Manners, inherited the Earldom in 1641 from a distant cousin. His son, another John Manners, was made 1st Duke of Rutland in 1703. In the 20th century, another John Manners, 9th Duke of Rutland, made a life’s work of restoring the hall.

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20 Comments CherryPie on Aug 8th 2018

For me, prayer is an aspiration of the heart, it is a simple glance directed towards heaven, it is a cry of gratitude and love in the midst of trial as well as joy.

Therese of Lisieux

Reflections

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