Concentration

2 Comments CherryPie on Feb 10th 2016

Slovene Parliament

A modernist block of concrete and glass designed by the architect Vinko Glanz in 1960, the political heart of Slovenia resembles a typical office building. However, the Sloven and European Union flags near the entrance hint at its importance.

The sculpted figures on the building’s facade comprise on of former Communist Europe’s more artistic statements. The work of 20th-century sculptors Zdenko Kalin and Karel Putrih, the ensemble offers a utopian vision of Socialism – workers, peasants, scientists and engineers striving together to create a new and beautiful society.*

Slovene Parliament

*From Eyewitness Travel Guide to Slovenia

5 Comments CherryPie on Feb 9th 2016

Roman Wall

One of the scant survivors of the Roman town of Emona which once stood on the present site of Ljubljana, the Roman Wall complex runs for two blocks along Mirje street at what was the southern side of the fortification. Built between 14 and 15 AD, the wall measures 2.4 metres wide and from 6 to 8 metres high. Renovated during the 1930s, famed architect Joze Plecnik took the liberty of inexplicably adding a bizarre stone pyramid atop one section of the wall. Another renovation of the Roman Wall took place in the 1990s. This is the main vestige of the remaining traces of Emona, which fell into decline around 600 AD.

Roman Wall

Roman Wall

Roman Wall

13 Comments CherryPie on Feb 8th 2016

If a man wishes to be sure of the road he treads on, he must close his eyes and walk in the dark.

St. John of the Cross

Lincoln Cathedral

8 Comments CherryPie on Feb 7th 2016

River Ljuljanica

River Ljuljanica

River Ljuljanica

Ljubljana Castle

River Ljuljanica

8 Comments CherryPie on Feb 6th 2016

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The main purpose of the boat is the transport of passengers and boat rides for tourists. Given the design of the main part of the boat, which measures 30m2, the latter can be used and adjusted for different activities.

Basic Data:

Type: boat with flat bottom construction, made of solid larch and oak wood
Length: 10 m
Width: 4,4 m
Capacity: 48+2
Weight (without passengers): 7500kg
Weight (full): 11500kg
Engine: E-Tec Evinrude 2×25 Hp
Consumption: at normal speed 1 litre/hour/engine
Steering: last third in the middle of the boat
Toilet and bar at the back of the boat.
Entrance: in the front, on the left and right

Untitled

Untitled

Information about the construction:

Time needed for construction: 3500 working hours
Usage of wood: 7 m3 of wood, 350 m2 Okoume plywood
Screws: 15 000, Zink- Nickel
Polyurethane glue: 40 kg
Epoxy glue: 55 kg
Fiberglass: 80 m2
Polyurethane paint: 50 l
Alkyd varnish: 27 l
Alkyd paint: 15 l
Electrical wires: more than 500m

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16 Comments CherryPie on Feb 4th 2016

The Cobbler's Bridge

The Cobbler’s Bridge was probably the oldest bridge of medieval Ljubljana. It connected the banks of the Ljubljanica between Tranča and the present Jurčičev trg (Jurčič square). The old wooden bridge, which was probably partly a drawbridge, was set up in the 13th century. Soon shacks were set up on it. As shoemakers had their workshops by the bridge, it got the popular name the Shoemaker’s or Cobbler’s Bridge. In 1867 the wooden bridge was replaced by one of cast-iron, an exceptional product of the ironworks from Dvor pri Žužemberku. The arch bridged the Ljubljanica for 65 years. The iron bridge, not distinguished enough and too narrow for the town core, was moved to the edge of the hospital between the wars.

A wide concrete platform grew above the Ljubljanica according to the designs of Jože Plečnik in the years 1931-1932. The architect designed a square above the water and protected it by enclosures with cylindric balustrades. Above them rise six pairs of pillars, which are the remains of the originally planned roof. The middle of the bridge is accentuated by two candelabras above the bearing of the bridge.

The viewing square rests on a single bearing in the riverbed. The architect had the banks filled in, so that the former stairs from the bridge to the embankment could be avoided. The surface of the bridge pours over to the banks in a paved carpet. Between the Shoemaker’s Bridge and the Three Bridges (Tromostovje), Plečnik arranged a lower terrace and intermediate “washboards”, where symbolic washerwomen, the weeping willows, bend over to the water.

In 1991 the severely damaged and corroded concrete enclosures were replaced by new ones according to Plečnik’s original plans. The pillars unfortunately do not have as refined adornments of the capitals as the originals, which were transported to the Architectural Museum. The bridge was statically reinforced, the upper surface was re-asphalted, while the accesses were paved with blocks. On the bridge one can often encounter street vendors, and in the summer sometimes even comedians.

The Cobbler's Bridge

The Cobbler's Bridge

6 Comments CherryPie on Feb 3rd 2016

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