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The Chapel was formerly known as the Resurrection Chapel. In 1951 it was dedicated to the Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, a regiment which recruited from the people of Halifax.

Laid up in the Chapel are colours given to the Regiment, many of which record major battles. In the frames on the wall are colours from the Battle of Waterloo and other conflicts. The final colours were laid in the Chapel on 31st March 2007 and the Regiment is now part of the Yorkshire Regiment.

The Carpet bearing the regimental crest, was one of the last wove by Crossley Carpets of Halifax and the chairs by, Robert ‘Mousy’ Thompson, have the same crest and a signature carved mouse.*

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* From an information board outside the Chapel

14 Comments CherryPie on Apr 10th 2019

Halifax Minster

Located in the heart of Halifax, Halifax Minster is a handsome 15th Century Grade 1 listed Parish Church; a site of major historical importance, a place of worship, prayer, of civic engagement, education and culture; with a year-round programme of events for you to enjoy. The church of St John the Baptist Halifax was given its Minster status in 2009 in recognition of its important role in the civic life of the town and borough.

Visit Halifax Minster to enjoy a tour of the beautiful and historic interior of the building, the beautiful stained glass and painted wooden ceiling panels. Look out for the mice carved into the Thompson chairs in the Wellington Chapel!

Halifax Minster

Halifax Minster

Halifax Minster

Halifax Minster

Halifax Minster

Halifax Minster

Halifax Minster

Halifax Minster

Halifax Minster

8 Comments CherryPie on Apr 9th 2019

…this is what I found this afternoon.

Leegomery Pools

Leegomery Pools

Leegomery Pools

Leegomery Pools

Leegomery Pools

Leegomery Pools

Leegomery Pools

Leegomery Pools

Leegomery Pools

Leegomery Pools

Leegomery Pools

12 Comments CherryPie on Apr 8th 2019

To walk in nature is to witness a thousand miracles.

Mary Davis

Apley Woods

6 Comments CherryPie on Apr 7th 2019

A Walk in the Woods

I was home alone today and expecting a parcel delivery so I had to wait at home despite the morning sunshine tempting me to embark on a mini adventure. The delivery arrived a little later than I hoped but after the parcel had arrived I decided to step out from my house and go on a short walk. By this time the sunshine wasn’t sure if it had its hat on or not so I chose not to take my main camera with me in case it rained.

It turned out to be a lovely sunny walk accompanied by beautiful birdsong. I heard a woodpecker tapping in a distant tree, saw two nuthatches scuttling up and down a tree trunk, watched blackbirds getting ready for nesting and squirrels doing what squirrels do. I regretted not having main camera with me…

The thirty minute walk I set out on turned into one hour and thirty minutes of enjoyment.

A Walk in the Woods

A Walk in the Woods

A Walk in the Woods

A Walk in the Woods

A Walk in the Woods

A Walk in the Woods

A Walk in the Woods

A Walk in the Woods

A Walk in the Woods

A Walk in the Woods

A Walk in the Woods

10 Comments CherryPie on Apr 6th 2019

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The Grade I listed Piece Hall, Halifax is a rare and precious thing, an architectural and cultural phenomenon which is absolutely unique. It is the sole survivor of the great eighteenth century northern cloth halls, a class of buildings which embodied the vital and dominant importance of the trade in hand woven textiles to the pre-industrial economy of the West Riding of Yorkshire, from the Middle Ages through to the early nineteenth century.

Dating from 1779, when it was built as a Cloth Hall for the trading of ‘pieces’ of cloth (a 30 yard length of woven woollen fabric produced on a handloom), The Piece Hall was the most ambitious and prestigious of its type and now stands in splendid isolation as the only remaining example. It is one of Britain’s most outstanding Georgian buildings.

It is impossible to overstate the scale and importance of this trade, not just to the history of Halifax and the West Riding, but to the nation as a whole over some 800 years between the twelfth and eighteenth centuries.

When it was built, The Piece Hall was a highly visible statement of the great wealth, pride and ambition of the cloth manufacturers. Although built for trade, it also embodied the most cultured sensitivities of the Enlightenment; these bluff northern manufacturers deliberately chose a design for their building which adapted the neo-classical orders of architecture derived originally from the Romans.

From its inception, The Piece Hall was a stunning combination of commerce and culture, an icon of hard business but also a broader statement about the history, the lives and the values of its surrounding community. This fascinating mix of purpose and idealism – business, arts and people, continues to influence and drive The Piece Hall’s role today. A direct link back over almost a quarter of a millenium of history.

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8 Comments CherryPie on Apr 5th 2019

Leeds Dock

Leeds Dock

10 Comments CherryPie on Apr 2nd 2019

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